SoMo: The Answers Tour

Foundation Presents

SoMo: The Answers Tour

Carter Reeves, Demarious Cole

Tue · April 25, 2017

7:00 pm

The Beacham

$25.00 - $299.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 12 and over

All patrons must have a valid form of identification present, regardless of age, at the time of entry for all 18+ and 21+ shows and events.

No backpacks, large bags or large purses allowed. Maximum Size 4.5″ x 6.5"

No professional audio/visual or any digital recording equipment will be allowed into the venue, without prior permission and arrangements. You must be on the artist photo pass list in order to enter with cameras with detachable lenses.

SoMo
SoMo
SoMo -- aka Joseph Somers-Morales -- will never forget being on stage as a kid. At six-years-old, he sang at a popular club on historic 6th Street in Austin, TX.

"I was way too young to be in a bar," he laughs.

However, his life took a bit of a detour away from music for quite some time. It certainly loomed in the background, but he had other things on his mind.

"My dad was in a jazz rock band called Duck Soup, and he wasn't always there," admits SoMo. "Because of the lifestyle, I just wanted to grow up, be normal, and have a family. My mom really raised my brother and me. I didn't fight music, but I didn't necessarily embrace it either. I wanted to do my own thing."

Throughout high school in Denison, TX, that's precisely what he did. He played football and hung out with friends, distancing himself from the proverbial "stage" as much as possible. However, in 2009, music called to him in the strangest and most serendipitous way. Receiving a piano from his mom for Christmas, he taught himself how to play by ear and recorded a cover of Chris Brown's "Crawl".

Uploading the performance to YouTube, it soon went viral. With his brother John's encouragement, he teamed up with producer and engineer Cody Tarpley and continued to cut covers periodically over the next year. Prior to the release of Drake's "Take Care" in 2011, he recorded a medley of the entire album and dropped it on the album's release day. That medley would go on to garner over 4 million views, and it started to solidify the SoMo phenomenon.

Throughout 2012, the singer and songwriter began to buckle down and work on his first original music. His efforts in the studio yielded the independent debut mixtape, My Life. A powerful, palpable, and passionate collection, it merged R&B spirit with pop soul, showcasing his dynamic voice and songwriting prowess. Released for free on his birthday September 11, My Life opened up SoMo's world.

"It was important to stand out," he goes on. "On My Life, we implemented different styles to show I could write over any type of music. At the same time, it's a cohesive story about my actual life since I started making music. There are party moments. There's heartbreak. There's love. It's real."

My Life spawned his first hit "Ride". Without any radio support and no label at the time, the track began selling 10,000 digital tracks weekly, while its music video directed by Dan Gotti accumulated over 3 million views. It offered a fitting introduction to SoMo with its sexy hook and slick, soaring, and seductive sound.

"It just happened one night," he remembers. "A girl came over, and I was drinking some red wine. I started playing the piano, and I hit my favorite chord. I wrote the hook right away. I was deeply in love with this girl and the song essentially says, 'I'm going to ride. I'd die for you. My love is forever'. Of course, there is that sexual element though. It's fun."

Simultaneously, SoMo released a cover every single Sunday as part of his "SoMo Sunday" campaign. Speaking directly to his fans, he offered up new music each week, and the series has accrued 50 million-plus views on YouTube.

As "Ride" continued to gain steam, SoMo hit the road for a sold out headline tour. Struck by all of his success, Republic Records reached out and offered him a deal in October 2013. Now, he's prepping his self-titled major label debut for a 2014 release. For the artist, nothing has changed though.

"That's why I'm calling the record 'SoMo,'" he reveals. "That name has been with me for so long. In seventh grade, a girl wrote me a note and called me JoSoMo. I thought it was cool so I made an AIM screen name JoSoMo. All of my football teammates and coaches started calling me SoMo on the field. This is who I am."

Ultimately though, it's his intimate, infectious, and irresistible music that's going to make everyone remember that name. "When I sing, I really mean it," he leaves off. "If I'm singing about a woman in the studio, I sing into the mic like it's her ear. If I'm singing about something sad or happy, I'll put myself in that mood. My music is driven by emotion from the inside. My motto is, "If it sounds good, people will listen."
Carter Reeves
Carter Reeves
Carter
Reeves has a spring in his step. Maybe it’s that he’s fresh off a six-year stint selling out shows across the world as half of alt hip-hop duo Aer. Or maybe it’s that his good-mood vibe is exactly what gives his particular brand of pop such an addictive bounce.
“The
thing I kept asking myself was ‘what does this make me feel?” he says. “I’d rather people be having fun, that feels more impactful than having people listen to my music and cry.”
Those
feel-good sounds are exactly what Reeves delivers in his debut solo EP Fresh Fruit. The tracks are sunny but not sugary, a smile in your ear, perfect for grooving out the car window as you drive along the beach. Reeves says he sees music as colors, and Fresh
Fruit is all in a Miami palette: yellows, oranges, pinks.
The
name of the EP comes from Carter’s favorite snacks (“kiwi’s always held it down, but I’m slowly getting into dragonfruit”) but it’s also about an artist coming into his own, ripening into a new phase of his career with music that is both tart and sweet.
Talk
to Me emerged from a creative process that fed off itself. The writing team focused on writing one amazing topline, and the rest of the song-- the lyrics, the melody, the beat-- all came from those first few notes. "That writing process was a first for me,
but definitely not the last," Reeves says.
Reeves
says the good mood vibes fuel his creation. As he played around with the first chords of “Fresh Fruit,” he thought to himself, “this is bright, this is happy, this makes me feel like I’m walking out of my house with a pair of new shoes on.” And so the first
line of the song (“It’s got me feeling like new shoes,”) comes from that feeling. It’s like a bottled happiness that feeds on itself.
That’s
the mood he wants to give to others. Reeves says that over the course of his six years with his old band Aer, he experienced a profound shift in his conception of what music means both to him and to his fans. “It became a job, and then it became a gift,” he
said. That gift is the simplest one of all: making other people feel good.
Reeves
has always thought of music more as a mood-lifter than as a competitive discipline. Raised in Massachusetts, he grew up singing along to Hall & Oates and Fleetwood Mac with his parents, jamming to the car radio and sifting through old CDs and records. His
parents encouraged him to take piano lessons— but he quit. They urged him to join the school chorus, instead, Reeves began playing around with some high school friends, and they started a band. They began to play a few gigs, and then a few more. And out of
that small high school group, Aer was born.
Reeves
started touring with Aer straight out of high school, which means he’s lived on his own for longer than most other 23-year olds. The pressures of doing his own laundry and paying his own bills are routine by now, and behind the youthful falsetto and hipster
man-bun is an old soul. To Reeves, feeling good doesn’t necessarily mean partying till dawn. He often spends his Friday nights finishing whatever nonfiction book he’s been reading lately, although he's just off a Murakami kick.
This
maturity makes him confident in what his music can do— and what it can’t. It takes a truly wise young person to recognize how much he hasn’t experienced yet, and to his credit, Reeves isn’t trying to pretend like he’s endured more pain than he has. “I don’t
want to narrate people’s problems if I haven't been through them myself,” he says. “I’d prefer to be the means to forgetting about those problems.”
He
offers oblivion, not catharsis. “I’m having fun making it, and I want people to have fun listening to it,” he says. “That’s what I want to give to people: a brief moment of forgetting.” As he toured the country with Aer, fans kept coming up to him to tell
him how much their music had helped them through dark times. Reeves realized that music that helps people escape their problems is just as important as music that helps people understand themselves better.
Demarious Cole
Demarious Cole
Venue Information:
The Beacham
46 N Orange Ave.
Orlando, FL, 32801
http://www.thebeacham.com/live/