Between The Buried And Me, The Dear Hunter

Foundation Presents

Between The Buried And Me

The Dear Hunter

Leprous

Fri · March 23, 2018

5:00 pm

The Beacham

$25.00 - $30.00

This event is all ages

All patrons must have a valid form of identification present, regardless of age, at the time of entry for all 18+ and 21+ shows and events.

No backpacks, large bags or large purses allowed. Maximum Size 4.5′ x 6.5"

No professional audio/visual or any digital recording equipment will be allowed into the venue, without prior permission and arrangements. You must be on the artist photo pass list in order to enter with cameras with detachable lenses.

Between The Buried And Me
Between The Buried And Me
What if dreams could be broadcast for the purpose of entertainment? Could you consume the innermost thoughts of another person on screen? If you could, what does that say about an attention-starved audience? More importantly, what would become of the dreamer?
Between The Buried and Me pose those questions and more on their two-part eighth full-length and introductory offering for Sumerian Records, Automata. The North Carolina quintet—Tommy Giles Rogers, Jr. [lead vocals, keyboards], Paul Waggoner [lead and rhythm guitar, backing and lead vocals], Dustie Waring [rhythm and lead guitar], Blake Richardson [drums], and Dan Briggs [bass, keyboards]—explore these themes by personally smashing boundaries once again. Automata marks the band’s first proper double LP-spanning concept. Moreover, they continue to expand their ever-evolving style, upholding a tradition of progression in the process.
“We never want to repeat ourselves,” affirms Paul. “We’re always trying to do something different, and this album fell right into that sort of pattern. We push ourselves into new places, while retaining our basic sound. Musically, we go somewhere that’s fun and challenging. We never know how it’s going to turn out. These are uncharted waters for us. We’ve never written an entire piece and presented it in separate parts like this.”
Tommy agrees, “This many years into our career, we want to continue doing things differently.”
This approach cemented the group as progressive music’s most unpredictable outlier since its formation in 2000. Among many milestones, they released 2007’s watershed Colors followed by The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues EP in 2011 and The Parallax II: Future Sequence a year later. 2015 saw Coma Ecliptic elevate them to new heights yet again. Not only did it bow at #12 on the Billboard Top 200 (a career high for the band), but it also garnered widespread acclaim from Noisey, Revolver, Alternative Press, and The Guardian who welcomed the album with a rare perfect score. In between, they launched countless sold out headline tours and support runs with the likes of Mastodon.
Now, they break more ground with Automata.
“Lyrically, I wanted to write something that I treated as a puzzle until it comes together at the end,” continues Tommy. “For as deep and dark as it is, there’s a positive outcome, which we’ve never had. The story follow a protagonist whose dreams are used as entertainment broadcasted by a company called Voice of Trespass. Most of the record takes place within that dream. The character thinks it’s all real.”
“Even though it takes place in the future, there are a lot of parallels to modern society,” adds Paul. “Oftentimes, we turn athletes, movie stars, and musicians into commodities. We forget that they’re real people with problems and issues. They’re society’s escape from reality as we use them for entertainment. Hence, society plays a role in their downfall, be it drug dependence, isolation, or even suicide. Society perpetuates mental illness with those expectations.”
Automata – Part I unveils the first six songs comprising the entire body of work. Stretching near seven minutes, “Condemned to the Gallows” kicks off this journey. Acoustic guitar builds in epic fashion before sweeping distortion takes hold followed by unpredictable rhythms and a seismic vocal performance which, as Tommy puts it, “sets up the whole story.”
Elsewhere, the trudging eight-minute guitar symphony of “Yellow Eyes” spirals into the melodic bliss of “Millions.”
“There are a lot of moments where we totally venture away from the traditional formula of what a progressive metal band can do,” states Dan. “There are all these little moments where we’ve done something we never did before. ‘Millions’ is the perfect example. It’s four-minutes of straight melody—another first.”
With Automata Part I, Part II, and the myriad of visuals on the horizon, Between The Buried And Me realize their potential to its fullest—and go one step further.
“All of our music should build up to the newest record,” Tommy leaves off. “That’s what happens with Automata. You can take little snippets from our past throughout this album. It sounds like Between The Buried And Me, but it’s still new. We hope to keep the music industry on its toes. This is part of doing that.”
The Dear Hunter
The Dear Hunter
It's been almost a decade since Casey Crescenzo brought The Dear Hunter -- both the band and the character of the same name -- to life with his 2006 debut full-length, Act I: The Lake South, The River North. Although it was evident from his stint as singer of The Receiving End Of Sirens, the record revealed Crescenzo's incredibly inventive and ambitious musical flair, something which has been evolving ever since. The two albums which followed -- 2007's Act II: The Meaning Of, And All Things Regarding Ms. Leading and 2009's Act III: Life And Death -- cemented the now 32 year-old as a maverick, idiosyncratic talent whose music, while fitting a modern aesthetic, was also from a bygone era.
Anachronistic and timeless in equal measure, the narrative of The Dear Hunter existed in both the past and the present, its detailed plot standing simultaneously as an age-old and new age fable. As that tale progressed, so did Crescenzo's art, his experimental compositions blurring the line between different genres to create a sound that was -- and still is -- unique to the band. But then, halfway through the six envisioned Acts of the Dear Hunter narrative, Crescenzo's attentions shifted. Between 2010 and 2011, the band recorded a series of nine four-track EPs known as The Color Spectrum. Later released as a single volume edition, each EP was a musical interpretation of a color from the visible spectrum, showcasing the increasingly far-reaching ambitions for Crescenzo's musical vision and his inventive interpretation of the world around him. Two years later, the more mellow and straightforward fifth full-length Migrant showcased a different side to the songwriter's talents, and last year he composed and recorded his first symphony Amour & Attrition. With such a storied musical repertoire, its clear Crescenzo is no ordinary musician.
Now, six years and two albums after The Dear Hunter released Act III: Life And Death, Crescenzo has returned to the narrative of the anti-hero who shares the band's name, applying all of the knowledge and experience of the last ten years to this new chapter. Picking up where the story left off -- with the eponymous protagonist assuming the identity of his late brother and returning home -- Act IV: Rebirth In Reprise is an album that explores the complex notions of who and what we are, and which attempts to answer its own questions through the wanderings and wonderings of the album's protagonist. Yet as the plot and the music weave their way through these fifteen songs, it's clear that they transcend the boundaries of the Dear Hunter story. This is as much about a return in real life as it is the fictional story.
"Revisiting something that was six years removed from my life," explains Crescenzo, "and going back to doing these records was actually a suggestion of my manager and friend Mike Marquis. We got talking about the title of the record and it really just made sense, both within this story -- which is about this character returning to a familiar place as a different person -- but also in terms of the music, which was returning to a familiar place as a different person for myself. So it was the perfect middle ground of describing conceptually, and as far as the plot goes, a story, but also a very perfect paralleling between my personal life and the story of the record -- that revitalization and rejuvenating that comes from revisiting something with a newfound perspective."
The result is the band's most orchestral and multi-layered set of songs to date. Both nuanced and euphoric -- sometimes at the same time -- their very essence breathes life back into a story that has been on pause for over half a decade, reigniting the lives of the characters with heart and aplomb. That's something Crescenzo insists could only have happened by taking a break from the world with The Color Spectrum and Migrant. The distance that making those records afforded Crescenzo means that of all the albums The Dear Hunter has made, Act IV's soundtrack to its main character's physical and philosophical journey is also the closest Crescenzo has come to realizing the true musical vision inside his head.
"I was trying to do it on Act I, Act II and Act III," he says with a slight sigh of fake exasperation, "but I could never get to the point where I was just in a room with an orchestra playing these parts, because I didn't know how to do it. It was this thing that I always wanted to incorporate into what I did before, I always wanted this and I was always upset that I didn't get it. This time, I could apply this knowledge that I actually possess into this music. It was one of the most exciting experiences of my life because the orchestra is such an integral part of that album from start to finish, as far as weaving in and out of the music and gluing it all together."
That's certainly an understatement. Aside from a couple of brief pauses, Act IV is almost one continuous piece of music. Whether it's the gracefully powerful lilt of "At The End Of The Earth", the frantic, almost King Crimson-esque 9 minute epic surge of "A Night On The Town" or the angular guitars of "King Of Swords (Reversed)" -- which Crescenzo says drew inspiration from unlikely sources such as ELO, Talking Heads and Michael Jackson -- it all creates a sense of dramatic momentum to parallel all the physical and metaphysical action that takes place across this record's ambitious 64 minutes. Initially written and recorded at Crescenzo's self-built studio in Port Angeles, Washington (where he now lives) with the rest of the band, once their parts were done, Crescenzo then set about finishing the rest of it himself.
"I tracked most of my guitar and then I finished writing the scores for the orchestra, so before I even got in to doing vocals, my girlfriend, my dog and I drove down to California and tracked the orchestra."
Played by the community-based Awesöme Orchestra collective at Berkeley's Fantasy Studios, it means the album truly is the culmination of everything that preceded it. As such, even though it's part of a fictional narrative, it doubles up as the band's most autobiographical album to date. That might seem like a paradoxical concept, but to listen to Crescenzo explain it, and it makes perfect sense. As Crescenzo points out, "There were always these big pillars of the story that I wanted to tell as far as broad strokes. It's always had Point A and Point B on a grand scale, but I like to grow as a human being, a songwriter, a lyricist, and I didn't want to bind myself to the outlook and my feelings and my personal headspace at 22, when I started writing this, knowing that it would be years and years and years before I'd ever get to the sixth part. I didn't want to control the creativity of the 32 year-old me at 22. I left a lot of wiggle room so I could pull on the new experiences I'd have as an adult and through the years it would take to finish it. So a lot of the detail is told from the last six years of my life going into Act IV."
As such, the personal growth that Crescenzo experienced in his own life shaped those moments. For a start, he wanted the band -- completed by Nick Crescenzo (drums, percussion), Robert Parr (guitar, keyboards), Nick Sollecito (bass), Maxwell Tousseau (guitar, keyboards) and Andrew Brown (keyboards) -- to have more input into the development of the songs. Secondly, he found his attitude towards the people who initially inspired the characters had changed over time -- and so had the characters as a result.
"Looking back on the way that it started," Crescenzo remembers, "the story was rooted in such an intensely bitter place I was able to demonize whoever I wanted through the fiction of it. What's really interesting is that, just by coincidence, in this story and in these characters who have been somewhat demonized in my mind relating to real life people, there are these moments somewhat of redemption for these characters. It was like I knew I wasn't going to want to make that record until I was in a personal place where I had sort of gotten past the initial bitterness and the grudge I'm incapable of not holding. If I had written it all as younger man, I think it would have been bitterness from the beginning to the end, and there would have been no room for my growth or the growth of whatever character I'm putting in there."
There are still two more Acts planned, as well as a graphic novel in the works, but for now, the life of the Dear Hunter -- both the character and the band -- is fully consumed by this newest part of the story. It's been a long time in the waiting, but that's precisely why the pieces have all fallen so perfectly into place. "Honestly," Crescenzo chuckles, "just the act of making this record after so long, and making the record I said I was going to make and not damning the younger version of me to having lied, is very cathartic. And when it was done, I had no idea what to do with myself. All of a sudden, I was finished with this thing I didn't even know if I would get to. I was blindsided by the finality of it."
One listen, and you probably will be, too.
Leprous
Leprous
In a time where progressive music is rising and there are so many options available to new listeners, it takes
serious guts and personality to turn heads anymore. Norway’s Leprous has done just that in recent years, and it
has been such a joy to watch them emerge into the limelight of awareness within the progressive community. It
is no wonder, however, as Leprous continues to mature and to cling ever closer to their hearts when crafting
new music.
Leprous is a visionary band that defies genre labelling, not just in the style, but also in their attitude. After
releasing “Tall Poppy Syndrome” (2009), “Bilateral” (2011) and “Coal” (2013); these artists released their monster
album “The Congregation” (2015) that spurred high acclaim and an enormous world tour. Leprous, however, is
not a band that takes success resting on their hind quarters, as they believe in pushing boundaries, learning from
their mistakes, and following their instincts. They are prepared to release their new album “Malina” this summer,
and it is set to offer a left hook to the progressive world.
Of all things, Leprous is not a band that can be caged into any single genre. They aren’t interested in any of that.
What they do believe in, however, is pursuing their artistic passions and following wherever their hearts may
lead. They have been celebrated for years for their evocative mix of polyrhythmic grooves, melancholy
atmospheres, melodic vocals, and biting lyrics; but their new album represents a pure stream of consciousness
in the changes they have made to their sound. It’s in this imaginative style of composition that the band finds “a
lot of the beauty about composing and creating: There’s always movement.”
The band, however, found their instincts leading them away from simply polishing the melancholy progressive
metal of “The Congregation”. They followed their conviction about creating music that feels right in the moment,
which they consider to be the core of all true musical expression. In the process, Leprous has become a band
that is “more accurately defined as a rock band than a metal band”, though even that label is unsatisfactory and
binding to them. This is music that expresses their souls, embodies their passion, and confirms their genius.
They believe in making quality music that speaks to who they are right here and right now.
About these changes, the band had this to say, “This album is the perfect example on how you can start with a
vision and ending up with a result that has nothing to do with the original idea. The writing of the album started
out with the idea to perfect the sound and working method we began with on "The Congregation". While the
writing process was actually pretty similar (30 sketches, elimination process etc etc) we gradually started noticing
stuff with the sound and the songwriting on the previous album that we wanted to sound different. Gradually we
realised what needed to be done. This album needs to sound more alive, more organic and more dynamic. The
longer into the process the more obsessed we got with this idea”.
Release Date: August 25th 2017
“Malina” is set to be a change in direction in more ways than one. Right away, you can see that the cover art is
more colorful and more mysterious than they’ve ever had in the past. The album itself has been nothing short
of a labor of love. The album took 4 times as many days in the studio to record as past albums, as the band was
certain that the sound they wanted would be found in the recording studio, and not in a digital mask that would
be applied during the mixing stage.
With this concept in mind, David Castillo of Ghostward Studios was brought in to produce and record the album
to meet the band’s demands for a specific sound and the then went with Jens Bogren again to mix the album.
The band was however adamant about what this album needed to be, “We wanted it to sound like it sounded.
We did not want to "digitalise" the sound.”
The members of Leprous have poured their blood, sweat, and tears into the process of creating “Malina”.
They’ve challenged themselves to mature and grow in ways they themselves did not expect. It’s because of these
amazing qualities that the band is set to conquer the music scene once again in 2017. Combining a new album
with a fresh sound with their upcoming, biggest headline tour yet Leprous is ready to bring their passion and
badass energy to fans and new audiences worldwide this year.
Venue Information:
The Beacham
46 N Orange Ave.
Orlando, FL, 32801
http://www.thebeacham.com/live/